Eaglemoss Employee Discusses Company’s Fate.

Starships Collection


Eaglemoss

A sampling of some of the 400 ships in the Eaglemoss line

Last month it was reported that Eaglemoss Ltd, the maker of a fleet of tiny “Star Trek” starships, had filed a “Notice of Intention.” This is often the first indication that the business is in trouble, soon to file for bankruptcy. The company, which is also often referred to as “Hero Collector,” has remained silent on the issue, offering neither confirmation nor denial as collectors wait with bated breath to learn the fate of their model and build-up subscriptions.

This week, Ben Robinson, the former head of licensing for Eaglemoss, has been making the rounds, letting the public know what’s up. Robinson has been involved with Eaglemoss since 1997, before it was Eaglemoss. Back then, a company called GE Fabbri was producing a “partwork magazine” entitled “Star Trek Fact Files,”  which offered an in-universe look at “Trek.” Robinson was the editor of the publication and continued to work for the company when Eaglemoss purchased it in 2011.

Robinson decided to end his silence because he felt his former employer had been “unwise and unhelpful” in their reticence to keep their customers in the loop. While his news is not good, he was able to offer some hope for Eaglemoss’ customers.


Robinson Confirms What We Feared

Speaking to TrekMovie, Robinson confirmed that Eaglemoss, which is headquartered in the UK, had entered Administration, essentially the equivalent of filing Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the US. Cutting through the legalese, it simply means that Eaglemoss is now insolvent and they have been taken over by an outside administrator, who will do what they can to get the best result possible for the company.

The news comes as a surprise to many. By all outward appearances, it seemed as if Eaglemoss was doing well. The “Star Trek” ship model collection was selling well and new additions, like the Caretaker Array from “Star Trek: Voyager” and the Stargazer from “Star Trek: Picard” were in the works. The line of books, including “Star Trek Celebration” and “Star Trek Shipyards” was popular and there were plans to add to that collection. And “Trek” wasn’t the only license they had. “Back to the Future,” “Marvel,” and “Ghostbusters” were just a handful of the lines they carried, with plans for more.

And that, Robinson postulates, was the problem. While he is clear that he was only an employee of the company and so not privy to all the financial record-keeping that